Best Motorcycle First Aid Kit: Touring and Commuting Options


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Last Updated: 9th June 2021

For safety, the most important item to have with you on your ride is a fully-charged phone. But a first aid kit is second on our list – always better to have it and not need it.

Throwing away old, never-used items from your first aid kit because they’ve expired is a good thing – a sign that you’re riding well. But you should always have the basics stashed.

We’ve made a list with kits suitable for serious touring right down to lightweight commuter solutions.

 

Lightweight Option

Held first aid kit

Held First Aid Kit

Small and Waterproof

The Held first aid kit is the lightweight/minimalist winner for its durable, waterproof construction, small size, and decent price. Check SportsBikeShop

Premium Pick

Lifesystems Waterproof First Aid Kit

Top quality and durability

The premium pick goes to Lifesystems Waterproof First Aid Kit.

It’s construction, components, and waterproofing are top tier. Check GetGeared

 

Best Motorcycle First Aid Kit Reviews

Let’s dive into our top picks.


Lifesystems Waterproof First Aid Kit

Lifesystems Waterproof First Aid Kit

This is clearly a premium offering for the more serious touring or adventure rider.

It’s made from tough, waterproof fabric with a roll-top closure and takes up a bit more space than many of the other kits on the list.

In addition to what you’d expect to find in any first aid kit, this contains a resuscitation face shield, scissors, thermometer, tweezers, vinyl gloves, and three varieties of bandage.

Check Prices on GetGeared

All of the typical plasters, alcohol, burn gel, and safety pins are also present and carry the CE mark. The real selling point of this kit is its waterproof case and tough polypropylene housing. This is suitable for touring and adventure riders with a little space in their panniers.

Pros

  • Well-made and durable
  • Waterproof
  • Very comprehensive

Cons

  • Not small

Held First Aid Kit

Held first aid kit

This water and dustproof first aid kit is made using PVC-coated tarpaulin. It’s small, tough, and originally made for the Austrian market (where carrying a kit of this kind is a legal requirement). Held make excellent motorcycle-specific gear and this is no exception.

Check Prices on SportsBikeShop

A silver rescue blanket, burn and wound dressings, disposable gloves, and scissors are packed into its compact 14x16cm pouch.

If you’re looking for the most compact solution, this could be it. Small enough for under the seat or in a pocket, and made by a reliable European manufacturer – this is a great little kit at the price.

Pros

  • Waterproof
  • Dustproof
  • Welded seams

Cons

  • Not as comprehensive as some of the options on our list

Check SportsBikeShop


Oxford First Aid Kit

Oxford first aid kit

This is another touring-oriented kit from Oxford but is small enough to fit under most seats. It’s not as comprehensive as the Lifesystems kit but does conform to the DIN 13167 – European standard for motorcycle use.

Check Prices on SportsBikeShop

This soft-shell pouch contains tape, bandages, a first aid blanket, burn dressing, scissors, disposable gloves and a variety of wipes. It’s compact and from a trusted manufacturer. The price is fair too. Recommended.

Pros

  • Compact
  • Covers most situations

Cons

  • Not as comprehensive as the Lifesystems kit

Check SportsBikeShop


Lifesystems Pocket First Aid Kit

Lifesystems Pocket First Aid Kit

If not quite as comprehensive as their larger, touring-style, waterproof first aid kit, this pocket set is as compact as you could want. Small enough to leave under the seat or permanently in a jacket pocket, this is ideal for commuters and everyday riders.

Check Prices on Get Geared

Tweezers, scissors, a variety of bandages, plasters, wipes, and dressings are included. If you’re after a micro pack with quality components, this won’t let you down.

Pros

  • Tiny

Cons

  • None

Lifesystems Dry Micro First Aid Kit

Lifesystems Dry Micro First Aid Kit

This is a tiny, high performance pack. PVC-coated cordura tarpaulin means this pack is waterproof to a whopping 60m – probably a little deeper than you’ll go on your commute. It uses a similar construction and roll fastener as the larger Lifesystems kit.

Check Prices on GetGeared

Like the Held kit, this one is manufactured to satisfy an Austrian law and contains burn and wound dressings, plasters, disposable gloves, a rescue blanket, tape, and scissors.

Tiny, waterproof, and durable – the Lifesystems Dry Micro is an easy recommendation.

Pros

  • Micro
  • Dry

Cons

  • None

Givi First Aid Kit

Givi has an excellent reputation for quality bike-specific equipment. This touring-type kit is no exception. Small enough for even a jacket pocket, you certainly won’t have any trouble fitting this into a top box or panniers.

Check Prices on Amazon

Included are wound and burn dressings, adhesive bandages, disposable gloves, a pair of scissors and two emergency blankets. There are smaller kits with better weatherproofing properties but this represents great value at the price.

Pros

  • Good gear
  • Reasonably small

Cons

  • Not as comprehensive as some kits

AA Standard First Aid Kit

This is a no-frills, camping/hiking-type first aid kit but is reasonably priced and contains all the required stuff. A zipped soft pouch, small enough for a pocket or under seat contains everything necessary.

Check Prices on Amazon

A variety of bandages, dressings, plasters, scissors, and a rescue blanket are packed into a pouch that will fit in a box pocket or under a seat.

Both sets from AA (standard and ultimate) are easy to recommend and your choice should depend on how much space you have to work with.

Pros

  • Cheap and cheerful

Cons

  • There are more complete options available

 

Care, Considerations and Cost


Does It Need To Be Motorcycle Specific?

Not really, the components necessary for a first aid kit don’t change a great deal depending on the activity. However a motorcycle specific kit may be preferable as it will be designed to be compact (to fit under a seat or in a pocket) and weather resistant.

 

Do I Need To Carry One?

In the case of an accident, you’ll probably be calling emergency services anyway.

But having a first aid kit can make a difference. Exhaust burns quickly treated with burn gel, for example, are less likely to scar.

Being able to stop or significantly reduce blood flow can also buy you valuable minutes while the emergency services are on the way.

If you’re touring, it’s a legal requirement to carry a first aid kit in several European countries.

 

What To Avoid

Super cheap kits are available and probably better than nothing at all. But with the price difference being negligible, going for a motorcycle specific kit is a better option.

At the very least, all the components of your kit should carry the CE mark.

Using kits made to conform to European motorcycling laws is also a safe bet. Their contents have been carefully selected by a panel of expert medical professionals and first responders to suit motorcycle-specific injuries.

 

Training


All the kit in the world isn’t worth much if you aren’t confident using it. Basic first aid training is a good idea for life but there are biker-specific training courses available that can make you more useful in an emergency.

First Bike on Scene

First Bike on Scene offers courses across the UK that teach riders the theory and practice around first response. This type of training stays with you and can give you much-needed confidence in a crisis.

 

Motorcycle First Aid Level 2

In addition to the usual first aid skills applicable to everyday life, this course focuses on the added dangers of dealing with a roadside, motorcycle accident. It covers basic life support and the safety measures necessary to keep you and the victim from further harm in traffic.

 

Conclusion


Get a first aid kit and leave it in your jacket or under your seat. They’re cheap, small, and lightweight. No excuses.